“Jackie” Review: One Woman’s Legacy

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Jackie

Director: Pablo Larraín

Release date: December 9, 2016

Watched: July 4th, 2019

 

I watched Jackie a third at a time. Breaking it up made it easier to digest. It is a filling movie, so taking my time with it allowed me to savor it. I was driven to see it on the 4th of July, thanks to Vulture’s Hunter Harris and her persuasive piece on why, exactly, this was the perfect film for this year’s 4th of July.

 

I felt this sudden overwhelming pull that I NEEDED to watch close-ups of Natalie Portman’s face as her character wrestled with psychological horror and descended into emotional distress.

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Natalie Portman gives the most acute portrayal of the act of bring shell-shocked, not simply the emotion. Her life becomes totally out of her control from the moment a bullet burst her husband’s brains into her lap. What happens after that moment, when she is whisked away and automatically officially stripped of her titles as “First Lady,” becomes the focal point of the film. Composer Mica Levi’s “moody, haunting score” sets the tone.

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Jackie Kennedy is poised. She is grace personified. She is dignified.

Jackie Kennedy is ferocious, a lioness. She is single-minded, determined. She is relentless.

 

Jackie Kennedy is haunted. She is alone and isolated. She is vulnerable.

 

All these layers of complexity are evident in Natalie Portman’s sweeping performance.

 

The camera dwells on Jackie’s disrobing as she walks around her White House chambers hazily. She peels off the physical evidence of the horror she witnessed, the bloodied clothes, then cleanses herself of the blood in the shower, only able to scrub off the physical reminder, but unable to wash away the emotional terror.

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“Jackie” has all the malaise of a horror film without ever verging completely into fear-evoking territory. Instead, we watch closely as one woman is forced to uphold standards of statehood during a time of intense, deeply personal unraveling. How can one truly grieve when everyone is looking to them like they are a spectacle?

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Jackie’s saving grace appears in the form of Robert “Bobby” F. Kennedy, her one ally in the loss of an intimate relation. He, like her, has a vested interest in honoring JFK the man, not simply JFK the public figure. With authority, he swoops in to ensure Jackie’s needs are not swept through the cracks. They only feel safe enough to express their unadulterated anger towards their new circumstances with each other.

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The film is interlaced with two very different sides of Jackie: her showcase of the White House pre-assassination, and her acerbic interview with a journalist post-assassination. The juxtaposition of Jackie’s stilted performance as a demure, doll-like hostess of well-placed proper domesticity against Jackie’s raw abrasiveness, cutting intellect, and knowing coolness is very well-played by director Pablo Larraín.

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Natalie Portman’s performance is a highlight of her already prime career. “Portman has a face made for close-ups,” Angelica Jade Bastién writes in The Outline. The most arresting moments of the film were in Jackie’s daze, her signature facial expression of frozen horror as her mind worked in overdrive to figure out how she could stem the bleeding of her life and regain control. Control over her dead husband’s presidential legacy, control over her own expression of grief and suffering, and control over her newfound loss in status. Every facial expression in the midst of the turbulence of her environment, of people deciding for her what her image as a bereft former first lady should be, of unflappable chaos, depicted unfettered, pure shock and dissociation.

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According to cinematographer Stephane Fontaine in a Variety interview, wide-angle lenses and extreme close-ups pushed Jackie’s distress after Kennedy’s death. “We didn’t use long lenses that would make for a more abstract background. Instead, we chose very wide lenses that allowed us to get very close to Natalie. It added to the paranoia and claustrophobia,” says Fontaine, who operated the camera himself.

 

Greta Gerwig’s Nancy was Jackie’s right-hand woman, her rock when she felt she was losing herself. Part acting coach, part best friend for her real-life crises, Nancy was her most trusted companion. She gave Jackie sincere love and understanding in a world where public presentation trumped personal emotionality.

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Where there is life, there is hope. The priest tasked with talking Jackie out of joining her husband and giving up on life remind us of that old adage. As the light shines behind Jackie, casting a warm halo-like glow around her hair while she plays with her children in close to the final shots of the film, we are reminded that the dead live on in their loved ones who are brave enough to live in an uncertain world.

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I give this film a strong A for its measured awareness, drawn-out enigma, and performative polish. Natalie Portman deserved all the awards.

 

Grade: 9/10

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Booksmart Review: Quintessential Queer Cinema

Title: Booksmart

Genre: Comedy

Run Time: 1h 45m
Release date: May 24, 2019 (USA)
Director: Olivia Wilde
Rating: R
Synopsis: Academic overachievers Amy and Molly thought keeping their noses to the grindstone gave them a leg up on their high school peers. But on the eve of graduation, the best friends suddenly realize that they may have missed out on the special moments of their teenage years. Determined to make up for lost time, the girls decide to cram four years of not-to-be missed fun into one night — a chaotic adventure that no amount of book smarts could prepare them for.

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In Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut, two high school seniors seek to reinvent themselves on the last night of their high school careers. Molly (Beanie Feldstein) is high school valedictorian and class president, en-route to Yale and decidedly into being in command over her academics, future career, and projected superiority over her peers. Amy (Kaitlyn Dever), her best friend, is somewhat of the bright light of the two, with her witty remarks, wacky dance moves, and unique style (hello, button-filled denim jacket over collared blouse!). Amy is hesitant, wary, and cautious, poised to bloom into the carefree embrace of her sexuality.

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Molly and Amy have a friendship dynamic that is, at once, unique to them and achingly relatable. Having to band together as “different” in the world of their cavalier high school, they’ve formed an intense bond, replete with synced up dance moves and compliment battles. All they have, it seems, is each other, and they make sure to hold each other close. While Molly is a classic Type-A perfectionist with the need to be in control, Amy is heavily into “doing the right thing,” whether that is a consideration for others or proudly sporting pro-feminist iconography on any surface of her own she can get. It’s incredible how much this film resonates with my own teenage experience with a best friend I clung to, just in a modern-day context.  This was a valuable representation of uptight, high-strung, innocent, questioning high school girls!

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A storyline I was particularly impressed by was Amy’s queer experience. I can’t express how beautiful it was that the classic slo-mo-staring-at-crush montage in a teen movie showed Amy’s object of interest as a free-wheeling skater girl. Amy is a ball of pure gay awkwardness, and I adore it. The depiction of her budding sexuality (with Diana Silvers’ excellent Hope) was equal parts sensitively handled and particularly wholesome, while still having excruciating bits recognizable to anyone who’s ever been a “useless lesbian” (myself included).

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In regards to Amy and Molly’s friendship dynamic, the film does an incredible job of showing the raw deficits of such a pairing. Molly’s need for control can lead to her being overbearing, and Amy’s reticence towards confrontations can lead her to avoid uncomfortable truths. Molly’s personality can, at times, eclipse Amy’s, causing Amy to follow along with Molly’s desires. And Amy’s indecisiveness and perceived passivity can activate Molly’s “pushiness.” The most revealing aspect of a dynamic such as theirs is that of one person being possessive over the other, who ends up growing resentful of the control. The film handles this kind of relationship delicately with undeniable honesty.

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The film also does not shy away from the process of individuation for the best friends. Amy does that by choosing that night before graduation to act on her attraction to girls for the first time, to delightfully shocking results. Molly undergoes a journey of noteworthy self-awareness, as she overcomes her superiority complex and rigid expectations.

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Diana Silvers’ Hope steals the show in certain scenes, with her devil-may-care attitude and rogue-ish good looks. Her casual cool is heartthrob material for us gays.

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Overall, the film’s comedic beat and classic storytelling make it a teen movie designed to make its mark on cinema for years to come.

 

4.5 Stars

Teaser Tuesday: Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

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Six Of Crows was easily the best YA book I had ever read, and its sequel, Crooked Kingdom, is even topping it for me.

 

Teasers:

 

“There’s a wound in you, and the tables, the dice, the cards – they feel like medicine. They soothe you, put you right for a time. But they’re poison, Jesper. Every time you play, take another sip. You have to find some other way to heal that part of yourself. Stop treating your pain like it’s something you imagined. If you see the wound is real, then you can heal it.” – Inej

This hits so hard. How many of us fall into self-soothing behavioral patterns because we are trying to tranquilize our inner wounds that we can’t even face?

 

“I don’t hold a grudge. I cradle it. I coddle it. I feed it fine cuts of meat and send it to the best schools. I nurture my grudges.” – Kaz

Classic Kaz!

 

“The thought felt like cool water cascading over the hot, shameful feeling of helplessness he’s been carrying with him for so long.” – Wylan

I felt this in my chest. Wylan deserves all the happiness in the world.

 

I am so emotionally invested in the core six – Kaz, Inej, Jesper, Nina, Matthias, and Wylan – and even the newest “member” of the crew, Kuwei!

Film Review: The Miseducation of Cameron Post

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This film (an adaptation of the novel of the same name by Emily Danforth) was a bridge for me, into a world where I felt heard and seen. I had been yearning to see it for a while before I finally gained access to it. It was showing in only one theater in Boston, the historically indie Coolidge Corner theater. Going to that theater for the first time just to see this film felt like a pilgrimage. Chloe Grace Moretz, who plays the eponymous Cameron Post, has been an admirable force of nature for me since she delighted me in Kick-Ass. I have watched so much of her filmography since then, but no role has spoken to me as much as her character Cameron did.

 

Cameron Post is sent to a gay conversion camp for being caught having sex with a girl. Her discomfort in that space is palpable. Chloe Moretz is adept at using microexpressions to instill real feelings of awkwardness in the viewer. The camera, up close and personal, captures all of her wariness all over her face. The camp is honestly not too different from a glorified boarding school in high school, and the need to keep the kids under close watch was all too real for me. I could relate to the quiet chafing away at the kids’ souls.

 

So it was endlessly lovely to watch Cameron discover two kindred spirits in her new friends: Jane Fonda (a rosy Sasha Lane) and Adam Red Eagle (the intriguing Forrest Goodluck). My favorite part of The Miseducation of Cameron Post is the platonic intimacy it dwelled upon. In a world where parents would be so cruel to their kids, and love interests would throw their lovers under the bus to save themselves, her friends are patiently supportive, softly soothing, and provide much-needed levity and warmth.

 

An essential part of the film is the musical score. It swooped and dove along with the temp of the film, and reached a crescendo at the climactic turning point. I haven’t heard such a magnificent score for a film in a long time. The strings, in particular, were phenomenal. Along with the music, the tight shots gave the audience a sense of the claustrophobia of the camp for Cameron, combined with wide shots of Cameron’s secret hangout spots with her friends to signify a space where she could breathe. The golden lighting indoors was also a nice touch.

 

Some  critics of the film argue that the film is permissive of the evils of gay conversion camps. I disagree. Although the two heads of the camp, Dr. Lydia Marsh (Jennifer Ehle) and her brother Reverend Rick (John Gallagher Jr) may have been portrayed “sympathetically”, the horrors of the camp are still felt. This is no cheery summer camp, even under the guise of karaoke nights and field trips. This film does not shy away from pointing out the lasting effects of emotional abuse on LGBTQ youth, or the kind of pain that is inflicted when they are taught to condemn the very essence of themselves. Cameron herself questions this at an important turning point in the film.

 

Cameron’s growth throughout the film places it firmly as a coming-of-age masterpiece. She starts out tightly wound shut, unwilling and unable to unveil her true feelings and beliefs. By the end of the film, she is open and unafraid, seizing her life into her own hands. She moves away from withdrawing from the program internally, to proactively deciding she deserves better. The final shot of the film is seared into my brain. Cameron’s friends are looking up, hopeful, dreamy, content, while Cameron is leaning on them, her expression one of resolution instead of abject discomfort. She has grown up.

 

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Grade: A

Fashion Inspiration of 2017

  1. Sam White – Dear White People

Image result for sam dear white people styleHer statement about pink dicks looking weird afterwards is a bit more subjective.Image result for sam dear white people clothesImage result for sam dear white people clothesImage result for sam dear white people fashionImage result for sam dear white people fashion

hermione granger

Image result for coco dear white people fashion

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petite

edgy

lioness

winxie

preppy

embellishments

 

2. Maddie Whittier – Everything, Everything

 

Image result for amandla everything everything

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primary colors

solid color scheme

simple

blue, white, yellow, green

 

3. Courtney Crimsen – 13 Reasons Why

Image result for courtney 13 reasons whyImage result for courtney 13 reasons whyRelated imageImage result for courtney 13 reasons whyRelated imageRelated imageImage result for courtney 13 reasons whyImage result for courtney 13 reasons whyImage result for courtney 13 reasons whyImage result for courtney 13 reasons whyImage result for courtney 13 reasons why

Image result for jessica davis 13 reasons why style

preppy

blazers

corporate chic

collars

jewels

embellishments

lines

ties

 

4. Girls – Before I Fall

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cool

layers

trendy

 

5. Sansa Stark – Game of Thrones (Seasons 6 – Season 7)

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Image result for sansa stark season 6Image result for sansa stark season 7

Image result for sansa stark season 7

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regal

queenly

wintery

stark

northern

 

6. Francesca – Master of None

Image result for francesca master of none

Image result for francesca master of noneImage result for francesca master of noneImage result for francesca master of noneImage result for francesca master of noneImage result for francesca master of noneImage result for francesca master of noneImage result for francesca master of none

purses

chic

coat

classy

classic

 

7. Coco – Dear White People

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boss lady

future CEO

put together

 

8. Lula May – Now You See Me 2

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swirly

fur

dangerous

fishnets

leather

 

9. Holly March – The Nice Guys

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kiddish

sweet

cute

 

10. Mia – La La Land

Image result for mia la la landImage result for mia la la landImage result for mia la la landImage result for mia la la landImage result for mia la la landImage result for mia la la land

bold

solid

primary colors

ladylike

swishy

 

11. Jessica Davis – 13 Reasons Why

Image result for jessica davis 13 reasons why style

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collars

trendy

A-line skirts

stripes

 

12. Kelly – San Junipero

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jackets

hanging

edgy

embellishments

leather

rocker chic

 

13. Iris West – The Flash

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coiffured

fitted

graceful

elegant

 

14. Kat – The Bold Type

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business casual

mix-and-match

experimental

eclectic

 

15. Rachel Menken – Mad Men

Image result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel menImage result for rachel men

boss lady

classy

polished

solid colors

bold

pearls

 

16. Molly – Insecure

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business chic

impeccable

suits

immaculate

 

17. Marzia – Call Me By Your Name

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primary colors

stripes

bright

patterns

summery ease

 

18. Mia – Black Mirror’s Crocodile

Image result for crocodile black mirrorImage result for crocodile black mirrorImage result for crocodile black mirror

teeny-tiny-pixie

chic

sleek

 

19.  Angela Moss – Mr Robot (Seasons 2 & 3)

Image result for angela mr robot season 2Image result for angela mr robot season 2Image result for angela mr robot season 2Related imageImage result for angela mr robot season 2Image result for angela mr robot season 2Image result for angela mr robot season 2 outfitsRelated imageImage result for angela mr robot season 2 outfitsImage result for angela mr robot season 3Image result for angela mr robot season 3Image result for angela mr robot season 3Image result for angela mr robot season 3

clean

polished

pristine

blazers

blouses

minimalist

black and white (and a little light blue)

sleek

slicked back

 

20. Lorraine Broughton – Atomic Blonde

Image result for atomic blondeImage result for atomic blondeImage result for atomic blondeImage result for atomic blondeImage result for atomic blonde styleImage result for atomic blonde style

coats

sunglasses

chic

heeled boots

femme fatale

 

 

Ember in the Ashes Review: Searing Political Fantasy

 

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An Ember in the Ashes

By Sabaa Tahir

Published April 28th, 2015 by Razorbill, and imprint of Penguin Random House

446 Pages

Read February 19th – 25th, 2018

 

Ember in the Ashes has been at the top of my to-read list for YA series, so I was thrilled to impulsively snag it at my local bookstore. I wasn’t disappointed. It was a wild ride! The action erupted in the beginning and it. Did. No. Let. Up. The double love triangle (or love square, as people have taken to calling it), was really complex, and Ms Sabaa Tahir did a masterful job of keeping me wondering who matched up better with who. Also, I found the character development really satisfying, with real growth in mind and soul in characters.

CHARACTERS

Laia

Laia started off really passive, without having much conviction for any cause (outside of saving her brother). She accepted what fed to her (by the Resistance) and was too trusting, naïve, gullible. She fell into the Black-And-White thinking of Resistance = Good and Mask = Bad, without critically thinking of underlying motives people might have. The only thing propelling her forward was her need to save her brother, without putting much thought into the greater ideals her brother was fighting for. I was so gratified when, by the end of the book, she wizened up to the Resistance’s corruption – fighting against the “Establishment” – realized the “bigger picture” (such as freeing someone like Izzi, which righted an injustice bigger than herself or her brother, and became an active player, saving herself and thinking for herself.

Elias

Elias’s soul was always in the right place. He simply needed the courage and the fortitude to follow through on his convictions and stand up to the “Establishment” that was the Blackliff Industrial Complex. He knew he wanted to be better than what they wanted to manufacture him into at Blackliff Academy. He could never be a mindless robot in their Machine. Yet, he felt trapped in the “System”. What I loved about his story is that he only became “free” when he took a stand for what he knew was Right. In the end, he did not follow along with other people’s interests, as he had been doing throughout the novel. He became bold in what he believed in. His soul became unshackled, and his body became so, too. Most importantly, he was <u>honest</u> about how he truly felt. That took Bravery.

Helene

Helene was my favorite! She deserves to be a POV character, especially after all that she went through – so I am so glad that I get to read her POV in “Torch Against the Night”! What I loved about Helene was how steadfast she was in what she believed in, and how unwavering she was in her faith in what she was doing. Although she subscribed to Martial ideals, I found it really admirable how she focused on her goals, and how driven and tenacious she was in “going for gold”. She knew what she wanted, and she kept her eye on the prize. She did not let anyone underestimate her, and she possessed a keen sense of self. Her character is inspirational. The best part is, she is capable of strategic thinking for the Greater Good. She truly wants what is best for her people and the Empire, and she was selfless in her pursuit of that. I’m glad that she wasn’t brainwashed by Blackliff in the end, and even though she had been a stringent rule follower the whole book, she broke the rules to aid Elias in Doing the Right Thing.

RELATIONSHIPS

The love square was intense! I shipped ALL of them! I genuinely had no clue who was “meant to be” and who wasn’t. Usually, it’s a little obvious who the “destined” couple are, but Sabaa Tahir pleasantly surprised me by making it more complicated – and messy! – than usual.

Laia and Keenan had that whole cute “can she melt his cold exterior” thing going on, which is always adorable. His hard edges started softening more and more around her, which was adorable.

Elias and Laia had that “insta-love”, “forbidden love”, and “opposing sides” thing happening, and it is always heartwarming to see characters that are trained to distance themselves from each other be ineffably drawn to each other, and discover their similar ideals through all the haze of exterior forces designed to keep them apart.

Helene and Elias made me so emotional! I usually am not all that into the whole “friends to lovers” thing, but they flipped that on its head! I adored their simultaneous realizations that they were Everything to each other, their need to be there for each other, and how they were such an equal match. Helene was “The Brain” and Elias was “The Heart”. The will-they-won’t-they feeling in the air had me swooning. Plus, I’m so into the whole fight-each other-but-really-love-each other thing. The fact that Helene is physically matched with Elias makes me so happy. I love when they have each other’s backs, but also adore the scene where they were sparring. That was beautiful.

My heart breaks for Helene! But Elias didn’t want to let her go in the end.  A true Tragedy.

BOOKENDS

I liked how the framing of the book showed the ending as a fulfillment of what the characters had been lacking in the beginning. Elias finally achieved the freedom he had sought for, while Laia finally had the courage to save herself – and her brother – on her own terms.

THEMES

The major themes I discovered were: overcoming fear, freedom, the soul, and the Spirit.

HISTORY/CULTURE

I found it cool how Sabaa Tahir modeled the culture of the Martials after the Ancient Romans, while modeling the culture of the Scholars after Ancient Arabs. She certainly did her research – it felt very “real”. I suspect that the Tribesmen were modeled after North African nomads, and I expect to learn more about them in “Torch Against the Night” (as well as the Mariners).

WORLD BUILDING

I’m so, so happy that the “intellectual” group, the Scholars, are the heroes and the protagonists in this series, and not the antagonists (like the Erudite in “Divergent”) nor the sidekicks (like the Ravenclaws in “Harry Potter”). Meanwhile, the “brawny” group, the Martials, are antagonistic, instead 0f heroic, for once, in contrast to the Dauntless and the Gryffindors. I appreciate that.

FAVE QUOTES

“There are two kinds of guilt, girl: the kind that drowns you until you’re useless, and the kind that fires your soul to purpose.” – Spiro Teluman

“Laia is the wild dance of a Tribal campfire, while Helene is the cold blue of an alchemist’s flame.” – Elias Veturius

“Even still, there is an animal freedom to how he moves, a controlled chaos that makes the air around him blaze. So different from Keenan, with his restrained solemnity and cool interest.” – Laia

“Fear can be good, Laia. It can keep you alive. But don’t let it control you. Don’t let it sow doubts within you. When the fear takes over, use the only thing more powerful, more indestructible, to fight it: your spirit. your heart.” – Spiro Teluman

“That’s who Helene is: Her faith is steadfast. Her loyalty. Her strength. They always underestimate me. I’d underestimated her more than anyone.” – Elias Veturius

RATING

5/5

CONCLUSION

Ember in the Ashes delighted, shocked, and moved me. I’m rushing into “Torch Against the Night”!

Call Me By Your Name Review: Gorgeous Summer Sensuality in the Depths of Winter

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I still can’t place my finger on when exactly I first heard about “Call Me By Your Name.” There has been buzz surrounding it for nearly a year since its January premiere at the Sundance Film Festival. All I knew about it was that it was set in Northern Italy and was about two young men who fall in love. What really drew me to it was the lush cinematography of the early promotional clips. My mind was set—I had to watch it as soon as I was able.

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This summer, the “Call Me By Your Name” hype grew and I was bursting at the seams to watch it. Reviewers were describing it as “tantalizing” and “sensual” and “summery.” It promised to be a visual feast with a beguiling love story. It also promised to be raw and heart-wrenching. The wait was excruciating.

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Finally, the time I had basically been waiting for all year arrived. It was November, I was in London and “Call Me By Your Name” had just come out in the UK a couple of weeks before. I was ecstatic. I got tickets to see it at the Curzon Cinema in Soho, a member of a arthouse cinema chain. The environment was relaxed and perfect—cushy seats, chill ambience and a packed theater full of other eager moviegoers.

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It’s hard to put into words how much I adored “Call Me By Your Name.” It’s genteel, refined and intellectually stimulating.

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The cinematography really sold the summer languor of the film, focusing on luscious, verdant pastoral views and casting the characters in an incandescent light. Every scene during the day was aglow with golden natural light, and the mood was somnolent. The night scenes were humming with barely contained energy, softly lit with hallowed coloring. The setting—a small town in Northern Italy in the 1980s—was picture perfect.

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It is set at the home of the Perlmans. The son, Elio Perlman, is home for the summer when he meets Oliver, an American PhD student who is studying the Classics with Elio’s father and residing with the Perlmans for the summer. And so ensues the pas de deux, a clandestine dance between the two love interests as they skirt around their feelings for each other. Elio (Timothee Chalamet) possesses an almost bird-like fragility, prone to sudden spurts of energy and flightiness. Oliver (Armie Hammer) is larger than life, filling up every room enters with his presence.

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Elio is the definition of precocious. He transcribes classical music, performs renditions of classics on the piano and reads and reads and reads. He is graced with intellectual precision. To him, at first, the burly American is uncouth and brusque. They are stark opposites, yet their chemistry is electric. Chalamet’s acting as the lovelorn Elio is magnificent. The sharp interest in his gaze when watching Oliver is palpable.

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This is a film that forces you to feel every single emotion displayed on screen. It holds your feelings hostage. And so, as it seeped with romance, I could feel my own heart spilling over. I felt the dizziness and the grandeur of that summer love. The scenes between Elio and Oliver as they discovered the depths of their feelings for each other had the wispy air of a dream. If you’re a hopeless romantic, you’ll be squealing internally. The sexual chemistry burns fiery hot and their mutual desire is as succulent as the fruits that thematically pop up throughout the film.

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Yet, with the highs come the lows, and Oliver must return to America at the end of the summer. This was the emotional weight of the film, and it wrung my heart out. Chalamet portrays a young man losing his emotional center with a sincerity that is absolutely heartbreaking. Elio’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg) gives a truly sagacious monologue to Elio towards the end of the film that touches the soul and which I believe truly encapsulates the weight of first love.

father

There were points in the film when I just wanted to bottle up the feelings I had in response to the imagery and keep them close to me forever. The music only heightened those feelings; the soundtrack was blessed with three songs from Sufjan Stevens (my personal favorite being the lugubrious Visions of Gideon), an artist that is able to transmit delicate love in his craft. The final scene was the most poignant and deeply moving of the entire film. I don’t want to spoil anything, but I will say that it will hit you in waves of emotion that you may have even forgotten how to feel.

elio crying

If you love visually, intellectually and emotionally stimulating films, you will find all that and more in “Call Me By Your Name.”

water

Side Note: How they make the simple act of biking look so spellbinding?

bikes

10/10 Stars